Jewish World Series MVPs

Jewish Major Leaguer Craig Breslow will become the 24 Jewish player to appear in the World Series, should he pitch for the Boston Red Sox in the 2013 Fall Classic.

Craig Breslow. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

The Boston Red Sox take on the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, which starts tonight, Wednesday, October 23.

Should he have the opportunity to come on in relief, Red Sox pitcher Craig Breslow will become the 24 Jewish Major Leaguer to play in the World Series, as documented in these postings from Kaplan’s Korner and Jewish Baseball News.

Koufax Upper Deck Print

Sandy Koufax Upper Deck artwork. Photo courtesy of

During the history of the World Series Most Valuable Player Award (which started in 1955), two Jewish baseball players and a player who converted to Judaism after his career won a total of four MVP trophies.

Interestingly, all three played for the Los Angeles Dodgers when they captured the honors.


Larry Sherry 1960 Topps

Larry Sherry Topps card. Photo courtesy of offers reviews of the players’ baseball cards and collectibles … which range from common cards to $100,000+ game-used leather, from books to DVDs, from postcards and programs to books by the yard.

Steve Yeager 2004 UD Legends 2 Autograph

Steve Yeager Upper Deck card. Photo courtesy of

To read the JSC’s overviews of the cards and memorabilia for World Series MVP winners Larry Sherry (1959), Sandy Koufax (1963 and 1965) and Steve Yeager (1981) click on the players’ names.

Feel free to comment below, or in the individual postings, to let readers know what your most treasured collectible for these World Series winners might be.


Editor’s Note: A version of this posting originally ran under the headline Jewish World Series MVP Profiles in 2011.

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Glickman Documentary Pays Tribute to Sprinter, Broadcaster

Glickman The Film

A movie poster for Glickman. Photo courtesy of

, a documentary film that looks at the life and legacy of Marty Glickman, a towering figure in the world of both Olympic track and field and sportscasting, premiered on HBO on Monday, August 26.

James L. Freedman wrote, produced and directed the movie, his first documentary. Famed director Martin Scorsese served as the film's executive producer. 

The documentary is "a labor of love" for Freedman, who got his start in media because of Glickman. According to the film's web site, Freedman — while still in high school — produced Marty Glickman’s late night radio program, one of the first all sports call-in shows in the country, on WNEW in New York.

The story of Glickman's life and career, both on the field and in the broadcast booth, is remarkable.

A track star in high school and at Syracuse University, Glickman was part of the U.S. 4X100 meter relay team sent to Germany to compete in the 1936 Olympic Summer Games.

The day before the race, coaches replaced Glickman and teammate Sam Stoller, the only two Jews on the U.S. Olympic team, on the relay squad with runners Ralph Metcalfe and Jesse Owens. Owen's protested the move and urged his coaches to allow Glickman and Stoller to run.

The removal of the Jewish sprinters was seen by many as a clear showing of antisemitism and a move designed by American Olympic Committee chair Avery Brundage, a Nazi sympathizer, to appease Hitler.

Ironically, both Owens and Metcalfe were African-Americans, also members of "inferior races," according to the Nazis. Led by Owens, the American sprinters set a world record and won gold in the relay. The Germans finished fourth. 


Glickman passes the baton to Jesse Owens during a relay race. Photo courtesy of

The relay victory earned Owens his fourth gold medal in the Olympic Games. Owens' achievement catapulted him to international fame, though it didn't earn him racial respect at home. Owens' record stood until 1984, when Carl Lewis matched the feat in the Los Angeles Olympics.

Spurned in Berlin, Glickman returned to Syracuse University, where he starred in football and basketball. His prowess on the playing field led a local station to offer Glickman his first radio job, which paid $15 a broadcast. 

After college Glickman worked in radio in New York City before enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1943. Following action in the Pacific Theater during WWII, Glickman returned to New York and started his broadcasting career in earnest.

During a career that would span more than 50 years, Glickman covered almost every sport that could be broadcast.

Glickman provided radio play-by-play for Knicks games and served as the first television announcer for the NBA. In describing basketball for radio listeners, Glickman created the language used by players, fans and broadcasters throughout the world today. He invented terms like "lane," "key" and "Swish!" 

"Marty Glickman wasn't the first man to do basketball on radio, but he was the first to establish the precise geometry of the court, using a language and terminology that survives more than half a century later." writes Dennis D'Agostino in a rememberance of Glickman on

"I strove to create a word picture that the listener could see in the mind's eye," Glickman wrote in his autobiography, The Fastest Kid on the Block: The Marty Glickman Story. "Not only see it, but feel it as well — the excitement, the colors, the tension, the enthusiasm of the winner and the despair of the loser."

Glickman broadcasting a Giants football game

Glickman broadcasts a Giants football game. Photo courtesy of Getty Images,

In addition to covering basketball, Glickman provided radio and television play-by-play and broadcast pre- and post-game shows for the New York (football) Giants, New York Jets, New York Rangers, New York Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers.

He also narrated sports news reels for Paramount films, announced horse races at Yonkers Raceway, and covered tennis matches for HBO Sports.

As busy as he was on-air, Glickman made time to teach and mentor a generation of sports broadcasters, including luminaries like Marv Albert (also Jewish), Bob Costas, Dick Engberg and Dick Stockton.

Albert, who is interviewed in the documentary, once described Glickman as "the greatest radio broadcaster of all time," according to Investor's Business Daily.

Glickman's professional accolades lend credence to Albert's statement. Glickman is a member of the National Sportscasters & Sportswriters Hall of Fame, winner of the Curt Gowdy Award from the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, and a member of the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame. He has also been inducted into the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

Yet, in spite of his success, Glickman faced discrimination in his professional career. According to the HBO web site, when the NBA signed a national TV deal, Glickman was passed over for a broadcaster with a "more Midwestern voice." Whether this decision was made by an executive who didn't like Glickman's New York accent, or subtle antisemitism on the part of the TV networks is open for debate.

Freedman tells Glickman's story in a 75-minute documentary combining archival photos and footage with modern interviews. There is, for obvious reasons, a focus on Glickman's releigion.

"People ask if I set out to make a Jewish film," Freedman said in an email to "My answer is not at all. The heart of the film explores what happens when an 18-year-old's dreams are crushed by racism and prejudice. Do they become bitter?  Or do they triumph in life as Marty did? Marty happened to be Jewish — but I feel the story is universal."

In a posting on IndieWire, reviewer Kevin Jagernauth describes the film this way:

"Freedman … does an admirable job of capturing the broadcaster, even if the structure is a little old fashioned, moving as it does between vintage footage (which has been smartly assembled) and talking heads. He veers toward hyperbole from time to time … but what he gets right is conveying the spirit of Glickman, the excitement of his work (even if you don’t know your three-point shot from a touchdown, it’s infectious) and the aura of someone who became a legend by not being as manipulative, cheap, mean, blindly ambitious or coldly cruel as so many others around him were. Marty Glickman was simply being the best Marty Glickman he could be. For many he wasn’t just the best Marty Glickman he was simply: the best."

A preview for Glickman is available by clicking on the video window below. 


Collectors have access to a wide array of memorabilia associated with the famed Jewish sportscaster, but little associated with the film itself.

Glickman radio ad ebay

A WOR Radio ad for Jets games featuring Marty Glickman. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Glickman memorabilia on eBay at the time of this posting include photos, a 1937 Syracuse University yearbook, ads for Glickman's radio shows, and copies of his book.

Glickman played football and basketball at Syracuse, and enjoyed brief professional careers in both sports. Patient collectors may be able to find vintage sports memorabilia associated with Glickman's college career on eBay.

While not specific to Glickman, eBay offers a wide array of collectibles and memorabilia associated with the 1936 Olympics.

Glickman is featured on 2012 Sportskings Series E one-of-a-kind cards. These include a Top 50 Broadcasters cut autographs card and a redemption sketch card, according to

These cards are not available for purchase in the Beckett Marketplace, eBay or Amazon, at the time of this posting. As one-of-a-kind cards they are extremely rare and would likely be expensive to buy, if they ever come up for sale.

Fastest Kid on the Block Marty Glickman

The Fastest Kid on the Block, Glickman's autobiography. Photo courtesy of

Among the books about Glickman on are his autobiography, The Fastest Kid on the Block. Others include Triumph: The Untold Story of Jesse Owens and Hitler's OlympicsGhost Runners (an historical fiction novel inspired by Glickman and Stoller's experience), Great Jews In Sports and the Encyclopedia of Jews in Sports.

Also, while not specifically about Glickman, Jack Kerouac described Glickman as "absolutely the greatest announcer I ever heard" in On The Road.

Memorabilia associated with Glickman the documentary is scant, however. "There is no merchandise or memorabilia associated with the film," Freedman tells "That is not why I made it. It was a true labor of love having worked for Marty producing his radio show when I was 17."

Before its HBO broadcast debut, numerous film festivals, including the February 2013 Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, screened Glickman. The Newhouse Sports Media Center at Syracuse University's S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications hosted a New York City premiere on August 24 that featured a roundtable discussion, “Memories of Marty,” featuring Costas, Albert and Freedman. Dedicated collectors may be able to find tickets, programs or advertisements for these festivals and events.

And, social media enthusiasts can collect tweet and postings about Glickman on Twitter and Facebook. The film's Twitter feed is particularly interesting.


Have you seen Glickman? What did you think about the documentary? Did you ever have the chance to meet Marty Glickman? What Glickman memorabilia do you have in your Jewish sports collection?

Let readers know by commenting below.

Wilt Chamberlain: ‘Borscht Belt Bellhop’

Wilt Chamberlain BellHop

Wilt Chamberlain: Borscht Belt Bellhop. Photo courtesy of

Wilt Chamberlain: Borscht Belt Bellhop is currently airing on ESPN's 30 for 30 series. The documentary short film, from the Jewish filmmakers who made Welcome to Kutsher's, sheds light on basketball great Wilt Chamberlain's Jewish connections and ties to the famed Catskills resort.

Directed and produced by Caroline Laskow and Ian Rosenberg, both Jews, Borscht Belt Bellhop examines Wilt Chamberlain's time working at Kutsher’s Country Club in New York's Catskill Mountain region in the summer of 1954.

Then a senior in high school, the future Basketball Hall of Famer served as a bellhop by day, and played basketball for the Kutscher's basketball team, which was coached by Jewish coaching legend Arnold "Red" Auerbach, who would later go on to a Hall of Fame career coaching the Boston Celtics.

According to the film's web site:

"Mixing rarely-seen archival video and interviews with people who lived and worked with Wilt during that magical summer, this documentary short reveals an unexplored and pivotal chapter in the life of one of basketball’s greatest players, and a fascinating glimpse of a time when a very different era of basketball met the Borscht Belt in its heyday." 

Wilt Chamberlain BellHop screencap
The film is available to view, in it's entirety, on ESPN's web site (or by clicking on the image above). Borscht Belt Bellhop is also being screened at a variety of film festivals. Visit the documentary's web site for a list of upcoming showings.

The mini-documentary about Chamberlain is an outgrowth of Laskow and Rosenberg's Welcome to Kutsher's: The Last Catskills Resort.

That film, released in 2012, takes a "fuller look at the increasingly forgotten aspects of this unique chapter of the Jewish American experience," Rosenberg said in an email to The film is expected to release on DVD later this year, according to Rosenberg.

Other than the soon-to-be released Welcome to Kutsher's DVD, memorabilia from both films is extremely limited. Rosenberg says that he and Laskow don't expect to have any merchandise to sell. "ESPN Films may later make the 30 for 30 Shorts available for sale at some point," Rosenberg told JSC, "but that's out of our hands." 

For now, posters from and tickets to the various film festivals at which the documentaries have been (or will be) shown may be a Jewish basketball collector's only option. Borscht Belt Bellhop made is festival debut at the internationally-acclaimed Tribecca Film Festival, for example. Visit the film's web site for a list of past and upcoming screenings.


In addition to the documentary film, Jewish basketball enthusiasts have access to a wide variety of cards and memorabilia associated with Chamberlain and Auerbach, including books, jerseys, autographed photos, basketballs, etc.

Wilt Chamberlain card

Wilt Chamberlain Panini Century Greats card. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Chamberlain is the subject of hundreds of basketball cards and numerous books. For a checklist of his pasteboard, visit To purchase Chamberlain's cards and other collectibles, visit the Beckett Marketplace, eBay or

Red Auerbach

Red Auerbach Center Court Art postcard. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Likewise, Red Auerbach cards — including several specifically Jewish basketball cards — and memorabilia is plentiful. For a checklist of his cards, visit To purchase Auerbach collectibles, visit the Beckett Marketplace, eBay or

For a look at some of the Red Auerbach memorabilia collection sold at auction by SCP Auctions in 2011, check out this posting from


Have you seen Borscht Belt Bellhop or the Kutsher's documentary? What Red Auerbach memorabilia is part of your Jewish basketball collection? Given his connections to the community, does Wilt Chamberlain have a place in your Jewish basekball catalogue?

Let readers know by commenting below.

Bud Selig 2013 Allen & Ginter Cards

Bud Selig Allen & Ginter signature

2013 Topps Bud Selig Allen & Ginter signature card. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Jewish baseball collectors have the opportunity to add a new card featuring Major League Baseball Commissioner Allan H. "Bud" Selig to their collection.

The 2013 Topps Allen & Ginter release includes standard, autographed and limited edition Bud Selig cards. 

Selig's card is number 300 in the base set. His autographed card is, somewhat ironically, #AGA-BS, part of the non-baseball autograph card portion of the set (a complete checklist of the Allen & Ginter series is available at

As with most modern card releases, numerous limited edition variations of the Selig cards exist.

These include miniature, black framed and a 1-of-1 mini "wooden" design varieties of the base cards. There is also a one-of-a-kind glossy card variation. Several different card backs are also available, in the style of vintage T206 tobacco cards, as are one-of-a-kind printing plate variations (cyan, magenta, yellow and black).

An autographed variation also exists. A red ink signature — the standard signature card (pictured right) is signed in blue ink — variation has a limited printing of 25 cards.

For a checklist of these cards, see

The standard edition and regular autograph cards are readily available on eBay and The base cards sell for $1-5, with standard autographed cards listing for $40-$80. Prices for the limited edition and variation cards vary widely, depending on the issue type's scarcity.

Unsigned Selig base cards are available in the Beckett Marketplace for less than a dollar. As of this posting, no Beckett Marketplace retailers are offering autographed cards.

Will you be buying the new Bud Selig cards? Do you have other Selig memorabilia in your Jewish baseball collection? Let JSC readers know by commenting below.


For a look at Selig's other cards and collectibles, read's previous postings about the Commissioner, including this posting marking Selig's 20th anniversary in office.

MLB New Jew Review: Josh Zeid

Josh Zeid Topps Pro Debut solo signature card

Josh Zeid 2011 Topps Pro Debut solo signature card.
Photo courtesy of JSC.

Reliever Josh Zeid made his big league pitching debut on July 30 with the Houston Astros, joining Nate Freiman and Kevin Pillar among the ranks of the newest Jewish Major Leaguers.

Zeid, a 6'4" righty, was drafted by the Phillies in 2009, according to He was traded to the Astros in 2011, in the Phillies deal for Hunter Pence.

A veteran of the Arizona Fall League in 2010, Zeid also pitched for Team Israel in the World Baseball Classic in 2012.

Jewish baseball collectors have access to cards and memorabilia associated with the big righty.

Zeid's pasteboard includes several cards from Topps and Bowman. Among them are 2011 Topps Pro Debut autographed cards (pictured right), two different 2011 Topps Heritage Minor League cards, and 2011 Bowman Platinum Prospects issues.

Short-prints and color variations of Heritage and Prospect cards exist.

All of these cards show Zeid in Phillies or Phillies minor league team uniforms.

His minor league cards include team issues from the 2009 Williamsport Crosscutters, 2010 Lakewood Blue Claws, 2012 Corpus Christi Hooks and 2013 Oklahomoa City RedHawks.

For a checklist of Zeid's cards, see

Zeid's cards are plentiful, even the signed and limited edition issues. They sell for between $0.01 and $5 on eBay, and the Beckett Marketplace.

At the time of this posting, Zeid does not yet have any memorabilia, other than his baseball cards, available on eBay. This is certain to change in the future.

Nor does Zeid have any collectibles for sale in the Astros online shop, although collectors could customize jerseys to include his name and number.

Josh Zeid pitching for Team Israel in the World Baseball Classic.

Josh Zeid pitching for Team Israel in the WBC. Photo courtesy of

Zeid does not have any photos available in the MLB Photo Store. In the meantime, collectors can find images of Zeid online, many that would make nice additions to any photo collection. These include pictures of Zeid in his Team Israel uniform.

Following Israel's loss to Spain in the WBC Qualifiers, Zeid auctioned off his signed, game-worn cleats, with a portion of the auction's proceeds benefiting the Texas Children's Hospital.

Zeid has, during his minor league career, been a generous through-the-mail signer. He autographed several cards for me while with the Phillies farm teams and during his time in the Arizona Fall League.

Josh Zeid signed ticket

Josh Zeid signs for fans.
Photo courtesy of

As this image from Zach Hample's Baseball Collector blog on shows, Zeid has been a willing in-person signer during his brief MLB career. Let's hope this trend continues in the future.

Zeid is an active user of social media. Tweet collectors can follow Zeid on Twitter.

Have you had the chance to meet Zeid or get his autograph? What other Josh Zeid cards or memorabilia might exist? Let readers know by commenting below.

MLB New Jew Review: Kevin Pillar

The newest Jewish Major Leaguer, according to, is Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Kevin Pillar.

Selected in the 32nd round of the 2011 Major League Baseball Draft, Pillar quickly rose through the Jays minor league system. He made his big league debut on Wednesday, August 14, after being called up from AAA Buffalo to replace the injured Colby Rasmus.

Kevin Pillar diving catch

Kevin Pillar makes a diving catch in his MLB debut. Photo courtesy of

At the time of this posting, Pillar is hitless in seven at-bats over two games, but he's had a couple of big defensive plays, including a diving catch in his first put-out attempt, and a bullet of a throw home to rob the Red Sox of a run.

A child of a mixed marriage, Pillar tells that he attended Catholic school and was bar mitzvahed.

Pillar also says he regrets not knowing about Team Israel's tryouts for the World Baseball Classic, as he would have liked to play for the team.

While Jewish baseball collectors may have missed the opportunity to see Pillar in the WBC, the Jays rookie has no shortage of baseball cards available for purchase.

These include 2012 and 2013 Topps, Bowman and Upper Deck issues.

Kevin Pillar 2012 Topps

Kevin Pillar 2012 Topps Pro Debut. Photo courtesy of JSC. shows 74 different variations, including limited edition and 1-of-1 editions. Prices for Pillar's in the Beckett Marketplace range from $0.25 to $500 for a 2012 Bowman Prospects Orange Refractors limited edition card (#24 of 25).

A search of eBay shows 200+ listings for Pillar memorabilia, mostly cards.Prices range from under a $1 to more than $150, depending on the scacity and condition of the items.

Also available, at the time of this posting, is an autographed Pillar game-used bat, with a Buy It Now pirce of $119. As always, buyer beware.

Assuming Pillar sticks with the Jays, collectors can expect to see additional memorabilia become available, including scorecards, programs, signed baseballs, photos, etc. Look for updates on

In the meantime, Tweet collectors can follow Pillar on Twitter.

I cannot discuss Pillar's in-person signing habits, as I missed seeing the Buffalo Bison when they came through Columbus to play the Clippers in July.

I did, however, receive a reply to my recent through-the-mail request for Pillar's signature. In fact, the signed and inscribed card pictured here arrived in the mailbox that same day as Pillar's Major League debut, less than two weeks after I mailed it.

Have you met Pillar in person or had success in obtaining his autograph via mail? What other Kevin Pillar memorabilia exists? Let readers know by commenting below.

Obituary: Ossie Schectman, Jewish Basketball Player Who Scored NBA’s ‘First Basket’

Ossie Schectman LIU

Ossie Schectman. Photo courtesy of Long Island University Athletics.

Oscar "Ossie" Schectman, the Jewish basketball player who scored the first basket in NBA history, died July 30, 2013 at age 94, according to the New York Times.

Schectman grew up in tenement housing in New York City, and perfected his shooting by arcing balls through a rung on a building fire escape, according to the NY Times remembrance.

He played college basketball at Long Island University, becoming an All-American and leading LIU to the 1939 and 1941 NIT championships, according to the

The SPHAs Book Cover

The SPHAs book cover. Photo courtesy of

According to his Wikipedia bio, after college Schectman played for the Philadelphia SPHAs (short for the South Philadelphia Hebrew Association) in the American Basketball League. The team, billed as "basketball's greatest Jewish team," was owned by basketball Hall of Famer Eddie Gottlieb, who was also Jewish.

The team's exploits are chronicled in Douglas Stark's book The SPHAS: The Life and Times of Basketball's Greatest Jewish Team, which is available on

“Ossie was one of the pioneers of basketball, certainly Jewish basketball, in the 20th century,” Stark told The Jewish Exponent

Shechtman then joined the New York Kicks, as an original member and captain of the team, which was then part of the Basketball Association of America, a precursor of the NBA, according to his obituary on the Knicks' web site.

In the league's first game, on November 1, 1946, between the Knicks and the Toronto Huskies, Schectman scored the game's first basket. Thus he become the first player in league history to score a point, according to this remembrance on

"Ossie Schectman was a true NBA pioneer," said NBA Commissioner David Stern. Scoring the league's first basket, Stern said of Schectman, "placed him permanently in the annals of NBA history."

The now-famous bucket, which Schectman told Charley Rosen, author of The First Tip-Off: The Incredible Story of the Birth of the NBA, came on "a two-handed underhand layup," according to the NY Times

The shot, according to The Jewish Ledger, inspired the title of David Vyorst's documentary film, The First Basket, which chronicles Jews' contributions to the early history of professional basketball. Video of Schetman's feat is part of the film's trailer, available below.

Peter Schectman, Ossie's son, tells that Ossie was injured diving for a ball during the season. The injury, combined with his ability to earn money while not having to travel led to Ossie's decision.

Following his departure from the Knicks, Peter says Ossie played part-time with the Patterson (New Jersey) Crescents on the ABL, where he earned all-star honors.

Schectman was a member of the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museum, the LIU Athletics Hall of Fame, and the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame. He was awarded LIU's Distinguished Alumni Award in 2013, an honor that Peter Schectman says deeply moved 

Jewish basketball collectors can purchase a variety of memorabilia associated with the scorer of the NBA's first basket.

Ossie Schectman Pack War

Ossie Schectman Remar Bread tribute card. Photo courtesy of
lists no card available for Schectman, and no cards or memorabilia are available for sale on the Beckett Marketplace.

Because of his lack of pasteboard presence, the sports card blog Pack War created a tribute card for Schectman, based on the design of the 1946 Remar Bread trading cards.

While it exists only as an image on the blog, the "virtual card" (pictured right) is well-done and would make a nice addition to Jewish basketball enthusiasts' photo collections.

At the time of this posting, eBay offered little in the way of Schectman collectibles for sale. The auction giant's lone listing was for a signed signed index card.

Closed auction results included a Schectman signed basketball that had sold for $127.50. This is a bargain price, in my opinion, for an autographed piece associated with such an important figure in Jewish sports and NBA history.

Ossie Schectman signed ball

Ossie Schectman signed basketball. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Certainly, patient Jewish basketball enthusiasts will be able to find other Schectman memorabilia that is bound to pop up on eBay in the future. This might include 1946 Knicks memorabilia, like yearbooks, programs or ticket stubs.

As always, buyer beware.

Book collectors have numerous options for adding Schectman memorabilia to their shelves.

While Schectman is, surprisingly, not included in early editions of Great Jews In Sports (my copy is from 1983, and Schectman is not mentioned), he does, have a brief bio in the Encyclopedia of Jews in Sports.

Other books available on featuring information about Schectman include the previously mentioned The SPHAS: The Life and Times of Basketball's Greatest Jewish Team, The First Tip-Off: The Incredible Story of the Birth of the NBA; New York Knicks: The Complete Illustrated History; and, The Mogul: Eddie Gottlieb, Philadelphia Sports Legend and Pro Basketball Pioneer.

First Basket cover

The First Basket DVD. Photo courtesy of

As also mentioned, Schectman is featured in The First Basket documentary.

Movie buffs can buy a DVD for $21.99 on the film's web site, which also includes other collectibles associated with the movie. offers DVDs of The First Basket, as well as movie posters
for the film. The DVD costs $19.99, the poster sells for $9.99.

At the time of this posting, no copies of First Basket were listed on eBay. CDs of the movie soundtrack, however, were available for approximately $10. The soundtrack is available as part of a collectors package on the First Basket web site.

Ossie Schectman

Ossie Schectman.
Photo courtesy of

Jewish sportswriter Howard Megdal authored a profile of Schectman in March for (access to the article requires a paid subscription).

In an email to at the time, Megdal indicated that Schectman and his son, Peter, were interested in selling Ossie's memorabilia collection.

Peter Schectman tells JSC the family consigned numerous items to The Ossie Schectman collection was included in the company's Spring 2013 auction, which closed June 8, 2013. A catalogue of the sale is available on the company's web site.

Ossie Schectman Contract

Ossie Schectman Contract. Photo courtesy of

Among the items that gaveled during the sale were Schectman's 1946-1947 Knicks original, signed contract, which hammered for $2,062.76.

Schectman's 1939 and 1941 NIT Tournament winners watches sold for 722.98 and $657.25, respectively.

His New York City Basketball Hall of Fame induction trophy realized $358.50.

A 50th anniversary Knicks jersey, autographed by Schectman, failed to sell. Perhaps a lucky bidder will win this wonderful piece of Jewish basketball history in a future auction.

With Schectman's passing, Peter tells JSC that the family may put the remainder of Ossie's memorabilia collection up for auction or private sale. We'll report on future offerings as details become available. 

In a recent online discussion about on the Jewish Sports Collectibles group on Yahoo, noted collector Neil Keller says he met with Schectman more than a dozen times at his home in South Florida. Keller says he and Schectman played "trash can basketball at his place in Delray Beach with a tennis ball."

Peter Schectman says his father was active in the South Florida Basketball Fraternity, a group of retired players , many Jewish, who met for weekly breakfasts on Tuesday and an annual black tie dinner. An article on confirms this, describing Schectman as "one of basketball’s great ambassadors." It sounds to me that Schectman was a generous and charming man. 

Did you ever have the chance to meet Ossie Schectman? What Schectman memorabia do you have in your Jewish basketball collection? What other Schectman collectibles do you know about? 

Let readers know by commenting below.

Biogenesis Baseball Cards?

In his "Big League Stew" blog on Yahoo! Sports, Mike Oz, playfully mentions a set of 19 baseball cards featuring the central players in the Biogenesis PED scandal.

Included in the rogue's gallery of images are cards depicting Jewish Major Leaguer and now-disgraced former MVP Ryan Braun and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig.

Ryan Braun Biogenesis card Yahoo  
Bud Selig Biogenesis card Yahoo

Ryan Braun and Bud Selig Biogeneis "cards." Photos courtesy of "Big League Stew."

Oz writes: "You may not be able to find them in stores because we're hearing they could be banned too."

No such card set exists, unfortunately, according to a tweet from Oz in reply to a Twitter query from

Mike Oz tweet
Disappointed as I might be (the images of the "cards" look pretty cool!), I'm keeping my eyes peeled!

I think they Yahoo Biogenesis cards are an interesting, if slightly unfair, commemoration of this shameful chapter in baseball history.

Ryan Braun Biogenesis ACCO card

Ryan Braun Biogenesis ACCO card. Photo courtesy of

The Yahoo "cards" are not the only collectible available to Jewish baseball enthusiasts, if this type of thing is something you'd want among your memorabilia and card collection.

A quick search of eBay found an ACEO art card of Braun, stamped "GUILTY" across the front.

The back includes statistics that says: "Also cheated."

What do you think of the cards? Fair play, or foul ball?

Let know by commenting below.

Obituary: Marv Rotblatt

Marv Rotblatt 1951 Bowman

Marv Rotblatt 1951 Bowman. Photo courtesy of eBay.

Former Jewish Major Leaguer Marvin "Marv" Rotblatt died July 16, 2013, at age 85, according to this obituary from the Weinstein Funeral Home in Wilmette, IL and this remembrance from the New York Times.

Rotblatt pitched for the University of Illinois while in college. In 1948, he struck out 18 Purdue batters, a Big Ten conference record, according to Day by Day in Jewish Sports History

The strikeout record stood until 1965, according to Matt Wille, assistant sports information director at University of Illinois. Rotblatt remains among the Illini's top pitchers, according to the school's 2013 media guide.

Standing just 5'6" tall, Rotblatt was "one of major league baseball’s shortest pitchers," according to the NY Times. Tim Wiles, The National Baseball Hall of Fame's director of research, states that both Lee Viau and Dinty Gearin were shorter, with each measuring just 5'4" (the Weinstein obituary states that Rotblatt was "the shortest pitcher to ever play major league baseball").

Rotblatt's height, or lack of it, earned him same infamy. He pitched as "Little David" for the House of David exhibition team while in college and once struck out 17 in a game against the Harlem Globetrotters, according to The Big Book of Jewish Baseball

Playing three seasons with the Chicago White Sox, Rotblatt pitched in 35 games, tallying a 4-3 record and notching two saves during the 1948, 1950 and 1951 campaigns. Rotblatt also initiated a triple play during his time in The Bigs, according to the obituary from the funeral home.

Rotblatt's New York Times obituary notes that students at Carleton College in Minnesota play a nearly 150-inning, alcohol-fueled intramural softball game named after the pitcher.

According to the Weinstein obituary, Rotblatt is a member of the The Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. The organization's web site, however, does not include him among its inductees.

The same obituary says that Rotblatt is a member of the University of Illinois Hall of Fame. While Rotblatt remains a leader among Illini pitchers 50+ years after he took the mound for the school, University of Illinois Assistant SID Matt Wille tells that no hall of fame exists for U of I Athletics.

My purpose in pointing out these inconsitencies is not to detract from Rotblatt's on the field accomplishments. It is, merely, to set the record straight.

Perhaps fittingly, considering Rotblatt's short stature and brief career,Jewish baseball collectors have a limited number of trading cards depicting Rotblatt. lists only the 1951 Bowman (#303 in the beautiful series) and card #73 in the 2003 edition of the Jewish Major Leaguers card set among Rotblatt's pasteboard. 

The Bowman card, pictured above right, sells for between $5 and $75 on the Beckett MarketplaceeBay and, depending on condition.

Marv Rotblatt 1950 Hages Dairy card

Marv Rotblatt 1950 Hages Dairy card. Photo courtesy of lists another Rotblatt baseball card, a 1950 Sacramento Solons Hages Dairy card (#73), available for $210.

A few Rotblatt signed index cards are available on both eBayand as of this listing. As always, buyer beware.

Determined collectors may also find memorabilia associated with Rotblatt's distinguished minor league career, including vintage programs, on eBay.

Collectors of Jewish baseball books can find Rotblatt featured in The Baseball Talmud: The Definitive Position-by-Position Ranking of Baseball's Chosen PlayersThe Big Book of Jewish Baseball, Day by Day in Jewish Sports History, Jewish Major Leaguers in Their Own Words: Oral Histories of 23 Players and Jews and Baseball: Volume 2, The Post-Greenberg Years, 1949-2008, all of which are available on

Rotblatt also appears in the documentary film Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story. In the movie, Rotblatt described how he idolized Hank Greenberg.

What other Marv Rotblatt memorabilia is available? What do you have in your Jewish baseball collection? Did you ever have the opportunity to meet Mr. Rotblatt.

Share your thoughts with readers by commenting below.